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Infertility

Life Is Hard, but God Is Good

By | Arts, Books, Infertility, Life In The Body | 4 Comments

In the past two months, I have buried my father and walked my daughter through open-heart surgery. The “windsock in her heart,” as her surgeon described it, that had blood flowing the wrong way, was apparently congenital, but we didn’t discover it till this past July. She is still in the hospital, but she made it great through surgery on Tuesday. So now, in my great relief, I have some time to reflect on the whirlwind that has been my life for the past two months.

My overwhelming sense is that I’ve been covered in the love of God. The Almighty works with precise timing that may not always thrill us in the moment (surgery the day before my first day of classes!?), but in retrospect is always perfect, and designed for our greatest good. That my father died during the summer meant Oregon was beautiful (such beauty heals me), …

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The Only Child: #Doesn’tPlayWellWithOthers & Other Myths

By | Infertility, Life In The Body | No Comments

My post yesterday at christianparenting.org

Jairus’s daughter. John Updike. Condoleezza Rice. Cary Grant. Chelsea Clinton. My grandmother. And my mother. Do you think “most selfish people in the world” when you hear these names and labels? Neither do I. But they were or are all only children. And the stereotype of only children is that they refuse to share, act spoiled, and hog the biggest bowl of ice cream.

Fortunately, this caricature of only kids as brats with tiaras or ponies on the back forty has changed somewhat in the past four decades, in part because more people have “onlies.” Whereas 10 percent of American families had an only child in 1976, by 2014 that number had doubled. Some place the percentage as high as twenty-three. And in New York City, like other urban centers, the number is closer to 30 percent.

Mothers with master’s degrees have more only …

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In the Near Future: Uterus Transplants

By | Infertility, Life In The Body | No Comments

The New York Times November 13 print edition ran an article by Denise Grady that announced “Uterus Transplants May Soon Help Some Infertile Women in the U.S. Become Pregnant.” The Times considered the news so big that a press release came to my in-box.

 

It’s all going down at The Cleveland Clinic, where doctors expect to become the first in the US  to transplant a uterus into a woman who lacks one—whether due to congenital factors, injury, or illness. The procedure would eliminate the need for a gestational surrogate.

After giving birth to one or two children—by C-section—the woman receiving the transplanted uterus would have it removed so she can quit taking anti-rejection meds. An estimated 50,000 women in the United States might be candidates. Currently, eight have begun the screening process.

The transplant team would remove the uterus, cervix, and part of the vagina from …

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