“Church after the rain,” Frankfurt, Germany

Lots of Updates and Links

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November was a bit of a whirlwind. I signed a contract with AMG for another book in the Coffee Cup Bible study series—Earl Grey with Ephesians. I taped an episode on the Empathy for the Devil podcast comparing the queens Jezebel and Bathsheba and the sexualization of powerful women. Check it out. The Kregel Academic Book for which I served as general editor, Vindicating the Vixens: Revisiting Sexualized, Vilified, and Marginalized Women of the Bible, was finally released Yay! Took a long time to ship, but it has finally arrive in the hands of all those who preordered. An interview with me about the book appeared on the Christian Authors Network blog; on the Beyond Ordinary Woman site; on the Seana Scott blog; and in Fathom Magazine, where you can also read an excerpt—Eva Bleeker’s chapter on Rahab. I spoke on the same topic at an academic conference in Providence,…

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Fathom Magazine interview w/ me about Vixens

By Arts, Blog Interviews With Writers, Books, Gender & Faith, Life In The Body, Women, Writing No Comments

This interview with me ran in the latest issue of Fathom Magazine.  Today we’re happy to have as our guest Dr. Sandra Glahn. Sandi earned her ThM at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) and her PhD at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in Humanities–Aesthetic Studies. A professor in the Media Arts and Worship department at DTS, she teaches courses in writing, medieval art/spirituality, gender, and sexual ethics. She is the author of more than twenty books, including the Coffee Cup Bible Study series. But today we want to talk with her about her latest book Vindicating the Vixens: Revisiting the Sexualized, Vilified, Marginalized Women of the Bible (Kregel Academic), which just came out. Tell us about Vindicating the Vixens. Vindicating the Vixens has been on my heart and mind for more than a decade. As I studied history and cultural backgrounds at the doctoral level, I ended up revisiting some…

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Interview with a Charlotte Pastor/Author

By Arts, Beauty, Justice, Life In The Body, Writing No Comments

I’m happy to have as my guest today pastor/author Winn Collier, whose writing I love. His latest project is an epistolary novel—that is, a story told through the medium of letters written by one or more of the characters. It’s titled Love Big, Be Well: Letters to a Small-Town Church. SG: Did you have in mind any specific congregations as you wrote? Winn: I carried all the people and churches I’ve been part of my entire life. And of course, All Souls Charlottesville, the people I serve now, is so interwoven with my life that they are always with me. SG: Charlottesville has been at the epicenter of America’s culture wars in recent months. How has your church continued to be a voice of hope in the midst of such toxic events? Winn: The Klan rally in July, then the Alt-right rally in August, were horrific. I’ve never encountered such…

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Buy a Shirt/Help a Family Adopt

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If you know the Glahn family, you know our “son” Carlos and his wife Karla. They are in the process of adopting a little boy from China. And they are raising funds by selling adoption t-shirts. The styles include a long sleeved and a baseball raglan in addition to a typical t-shirt. Our grandson-in-love is 9 months old, and they have named him Asher (Gen. 30:13). They expect to travel in five to six months, though Carlos is praying for a miracle of January travel. Their adoption agency has asked them to get the remainder of their funds in order. Because or their friends’ generosity and spreading the word, they have sufficient funds to cover their final agency fees. But what they lack are  in-country adoption costs and travel expenses. The agency has stated that a good estimate of in-country + travel costs is $15,500. (This estimate includes official in-country…

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“No Greater Love” film headed your way?

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NO GREATER LOVE—the first theatrical documentary filmed and directed by an active-duty soldier—brings to vivid life the battles of the “No Slack” Battalion of the famed 101st Airborne Division in Afghanistan. And the battles he shows us didn’t just happen in the field. They continue after soldiers return home. One of the coolest parts about this for me is that its writer and that active-duty soldier/producer was one of my writing students. Friday, Nov. 10, for Veterans Day weekend, his multiple-award-winning NO GREATER LOVE premieres in select cities nationwide. NO GREATER LOVE, after one round of cuts, is still a contender for Documentary Feature in the 2017 Academy Award®. You can bring this excellent film to a theater near you. It takes less than 30 seconds to put in your request: REQUEST THEATERS TO SHOW NO GREATER LOVE IN YOUR AREA The film will help raise awareness about PTDS. Consider that:…

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#MeToo: Just Another Trend?

By Gender & Faith, Justice, Life In The Body, Women No Comments

My post for October 24 on the Engage blog at bible.org: A lot of people think it all started on October 5, 2017, when the New York Times first broke the story accusing Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment. Actually, as far as I know, the real first “Me Too” movement started a decade ago by the African-American activist Tarana Burke. And ten years from now, we’ll probably still need one. But about the recent one… Ten days after the NYT story hit, actress Alyssa Milano tweeted, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Soon, the #MeToo hashtag took over social media. Twitter alone had more than 500,00 uses. But Facebook had 12 million. Twelve. Million. I almost didn’t put the following post on Facebook. But I mustered the courage to hit “return”:  “So many have been groped, objectified, threatened, stalked, or…

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My thoughts on history, Las Vegas, and Texas evangelical women

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An organization for women called IF:Gathering, the brainchild of Jennie Allen, offers lots of resources, primarily for a Millennial audience. I’ve been filming some short commentary for their series on Church History with my colleague Glenn Kreider. And here’s one that ran this week: AD2 W3D1 – The Crusades Commence from IF : Equip on Vimeo. Also,  an article on how to minister in the wake of violence in Las Vegas and the string of natural disasters, ran on the Pastor Resources site as well as on KCBI radio’s blog. Then I got quoted in what I thought was going to be an article about Texas evangelical women, but it ended up really focused on Jenn Hatmaker for Texas Monthly magazine. And KCBI-Dallas radio station interviewed me for an on-air audio segment about suffering in the wake of the Las Vegas tragedy. It aired October 3 and was edited for release…

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Help Yourself to Mental Health

By Life In The Body 2 Comments

Carrying a lot of stress? There are lots of ways you can help yourself cope. Tell yourself the truth. Treat yourself with the same grace you would extend to others. If you make an error, instead of berating yourself, replace, “I’m an idiot,” with “Oops. I took a wrong turn.” Confess. Quit living with guilt. Acknowledge sin to God and apologize to people you’ve wronged. Make appropriate reparations. Care for your body. Take walks, jog, hit the gym. Physical health and aerobic exercise have a direct effect on mental health. Snack on veggies. Good nutrition affects physical health and outlook, too. So replace chips and sour cream dip with crackers and hummus. Sleep. Get to bed on time and transition off technology well before you need to be falling asleep. Get regular check-ups. See a doctor for hormone and mood checks and to monitor health conditions. Live in community. Even…

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Rape Culture Series

By Gender & Faith, Justice, Life In The Body, Women No Comments

Did you catch the series I ran on rape culture? If not, here are links to all the posts. Part 1: Rape Culture 101 Part 2: Victim-Blaming and “Slut-Shaming” Part 3: Saying “Yes” Isn’t Enough Part 4: Consent vs. Non-Consent Part 5: Rape Doesn’t Just Happen in Dark Alleys Part 6: Popular Culture and Rape Culture Part 7: Films and Rape Culture Part 8: Books and Rape Culture Part 9: Rape Culture and Language Part 10: Rape Culture and Government Part 11: Rape Culture and Our Schools Part 12: Rape Culture and the Media Part 13: Rape Culture: It’s Bigger Than We Think Part 14: Rape: It’s a Weapon Part 15: Rape Culture: A Sense of Entitlement Part 16: Rape Culture: Almost Every Woman Has a Story Part 17: Rape Culture: What Can We Do? Part 18 of 18: Resources on Rape Culture

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“All Saints” Film Spotlights Church of 12 That Aided 65 Refugees

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By Michael Foust When sixty-five refugees from Southeast Asia started attending Michael Spurlock’s tiny church in Smyrna, Tenn., about a decade ago, he welcomed them, even though the struggling congregation was on the verge of closing its doors. Still, a question lingered in his mind: If the church of only twelve members couldn’t pay its own bills, how could it meet the needs of others? The answer, he says, came from heaven. Spurlock was walking through a large field owned by the church one day when he sensed God telling him, “I’ve given you land, and I have sent you farmers from the other side of the world. Get to work.” The solution seemed simple enough. The Karen refugees who fled Myanmar (Burma) had extensive experience in agriculture, and Spurlock’s congregation—All Saints Episcopal Church—had plenty of property. It even was adjacent to a creek. Church members and the Karen people…

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The True Beauty of Women

By Beauty, Life In The Body, Women One Comment

Whatever is true…think on these things. The Thai branch of a Japanese lingerie company, Wacoal, doesn’t feature scantily clad models in their ads. Instead, they tell true stories with life-affirming messages that everyone can watch and appreciate. The ads emphasize women’s true beauty. And the men in the stories are the kind of guys who appreciate goodness, and are not necessarily sexually involved with the women whom they admire and whose stories they tell. Check out the “My Beautiful Woman” ad campaign.

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The Protestant Reformation at 500

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In January, I had the privilege of going on a press junket to Germany to retrace the steps of Martin Luther. This fall marks the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, so I visited the Luther sites. My travel/reflection article about it ran today over at Fathom. But they don’t have this picture of me standing next to Phillip Melanchthon. To get cool inside stuff like that you have to visit my blog here. Thanks for reading!

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On Feminism and Evangelicalism

By Gender & Faith, Justice, Life In The Body, Women No Comments

As part of my PhD research, I read Betty Friedan, heard Gloria Steinem in person, and spent a bunch of semesters exploring the history and teachings of feminism. And after I did so, I reached the conclusion that evangelicals in general need to pull back and regroup both in our representations of feminists and in our approach to reaching them. Just as there is not one “Christianity” but many Christianities (e.g., Orthodox, Catholic, Anglo-Catholic, Protestant, Lutheran, Armenian, Calvinist), there are many feminisms (liberal, radical, Marxist, socialist, lesbian, biblical, difference feminists [we are women—viva le difference! from men] and sameness feminists [we’re the same except for biology]), and more. Liberal feminists came out of the Equal Rights Movement. Betty Friedan was one of them. They are interested in equality, not to be confused with sameness. That is, they want the law to quit “seeing gender,” i.e., being biased against one sex…

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Update on My Nephew

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In early May, Jonathan, my nephew and a busy college student, began feeling tired and congested. He pushed through to make it to classes, work, and AWANA, where he taught children about God’s love. Then a dark spot appeared on one of his front teeth. Exhausted, he slept several days away, and then another dark spot appeared on one of his upper front teeth—but this time, it was accompanied by intense throbbing. His dentist, who X-rayed his teeth and found everything to be normal, told him to see a doctor immediately. He suspected something immunological, And sure enough, blood tests showed acute leukemia. The physician called Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU) and talked to the doctors there, then directed Jonathan and my sister, his mom, to go to the ER immediately. The OHSU team would be waiting. Jonathan quickly developed pneumonia and was moved to ICU. And we almost lost him.  We prayed…

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Drowning? Chris Can Help…

By Life In The Body, Uncategorized One Comment

Today I’m happy to have as my guest Chris Maxwell, who has recently authored a new book about some deep trials he and his family have experienced and survived with some wisdom to share.  Question: Tell us about your newest book, Underwater: When Encephalitis, Brain Injury, and Epilepsy Change Everything. Chris: Underwater takes readers through my battle with encephalitis—a time I almost died, but lived and became a much different person. I now live with severe brain damage and epilepsy. Many things that were easy for me before I cannot do, or I find them difficult. My wife, Debbie, and all three of our sons contributed to the book. We included stories about how our lives changed as well as stories from others who live with epilepsy.  We also included advice from a counselor for caregivers—those family members and friends who are often forgotten in underwater stories. Question: Underwater is an interesting title. Is…

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Responding to Religious Freedom Executive Order

By Justice No Comments

The NEA sent this press release yesterday – The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) commends President Trump for announcing today a policy of protecting and vigorously promoting religious freedom. Religious freedom is a gift from God to people of all faiths and none, and is an indispensable foundation for human flourishing. We are grateful for the extent to which our constitution and laws protect the freedom of all Americans. We welcome the promise, repeated today, that religious organizations will not be required to provide drugs that may act as abortifacients and services that violate their commitment to protect all human life. Now we call on the administration to promptly issue revised regulations and resolve lingering legal disputes over this issue. Most evangelical leaders do not think pastors should endorse political candidates from the pulpit, according to the February Evangelical Leaders Survey. As Leith Anderson, NAE president, said, “Evangelicals emphasize evangelism, and…

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My Thoughts on Gender

By Blog Interviews With Writers, Gender & Faith, Justice, Women No Comments

We Talk Different is a podcast on culture, race, ethnicity, gender, politics, and theology. Recently my friend Jurrita and I were featured on the podcast talking about gender and faith and race. You can get the scoop at iTunes. 5 The “Chrisitanity and Gender” Edition – 3.14.17 – Part II The WTD team wraps up their conversation with Jur… 3/13/2017 Free View in iTunes 7 The “Christianity and Gender” Edition – 3.7.16 – Part I This week the WTD Team brings in the real intelle… 3/6/2017 Free View in iTunes

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Vindicating the Vixens

By Gender & Faith, Women, Writing One Comment

On March 23 at DTS, I moderated a panel discussion with Dr. Glenn Kreider, Sarah Bowler, Sharifa Stevens, Dr. Timothy Ralston, and Karla Zazueta about women in the Bible whom we have either vilified or marginalized. Vindicating the Vixens (Kregel Academic, forthcoming) is the result of a diverse team of 16 male and female theologians who’ve partnered to take a second look at vilified and marginalized women in the Bible, and we got some of the contributors in Dallas together to talk about our findings. The church has often viewed women’s stories through sexist eyes, resulting in a range of distortions. In this panel discussion, three of us DTS profs and three graduates talk about the women we explored. Order Vindicating the Vixens.

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Protestants at 500 Years: The Best-Known Female Reformer

By Marriage, Women No Comments

In this year, which marks the five-hundredth anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation, many are focusing on the male reformers. But Germany is also focused on some of the females.  Though quite influential, they are often forgotten. And we can learn much from their lives. I’m thinking of one in particular. Come back in time with me to about 1499 in what we know today as eastern Germany—then called Saxony. And picture a girl born to a noble family. When she turns five, her mother dies and her father sends her to a cloister.  There she receives a nun’s education. When she is about 24, she and some of her friends—aware of the reform movement and dissatisfied with their lives in the monastery—seek to flee. Like so many others, they haven’t  taken vows of celibacy due to calling, but due to a parent’s decision (sometimes for reasons of economic and/or convenience)—something which…

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Eisenach and Erfurt plus Warburg Castle

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So far I’ve had a whirlwind trip in frigid temps. In seventeen-degree temps yesterday, we walked more than nine miles. But I’m getting ahead of myself. I flew to Frankfurt and caught a train to Eisenach, where friends met me at the train station. On Epiphany, my friend Robin and I toured Eisenach, a picturesque town where Bach was born and baptized, and 200 years earlier Martin Luther sang in the same church as a choirboy. (Elizabeth of Hungary was also married here at age 14.) The Luther house and the Bach museum both had fantastic exhibits that we had pretty much all to ourselves. In the afternoon, we toured Warburg Castle, where Luther hid out as Squire George and translated the entire New Testament in ten months. He had sparked quite a controversy with his writings. In the evening, we took a train to Erfurt, where we’re staying in the now Augustinian monastery that…

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Departing for Germany

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The past month has been a flurry of activity. I visited my mom and sister and her family in Oregon for our third annual Christmas Ships on the Columbia parade. I wrapped up the semester and graded about ten pounds worth of papers. And I hosted a bunch of family for Christmas, which included a day in Waco visiting Magnolia Markets and the Dr Pepper museum. The new year brought more family and packing…for Germany. I depart today on a nine-day press junket in Luther country as a guest of the German National Tourist office. (Please pray for me!) This year will mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, commencing on October 31, the day Martin Luther is said to have nailed his 95 theses to the door of the castle church in Wittenberg. I’ll update you here as I’m able. Snow covers the ground where I’m going. I also have a…

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Spiritual Mothers: A Guest Post

By Gender & Faith, Women No Comments

Today I’m happy to feature Kat Armstrong here as a guest post-er. Kat is a former student and savvy business woman (Baby Bow Tie) who co-founded Polished Ministries, an outreach to young business women. When I read this post she wrote on her own blog, I asked if I could run it again here:  My heart feels like it’s going to burst through my chest. I’ve tried working on other projects this weekend, projects I’m really excited about with looming deadlines, and yet I keep coming back to this keep-me-up-at-night message: We need all Christ-followers intentionally investing in younger generations now. Maybe it’s the Irish/Latino mix I’ve got in my blood, but I tend to get fired up about lots of things. But make no mistake, this is not your average Kat-plea to see again afresh the gospel of Christ, in general. This is urgent and specific. Although I am a…

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I post on the Engage blog for women in leadership at Bible.org every other Tuesday.

On the Nightstand/In My Kindle
Silence, by Shusaku Endo; Silence and Beauty, by Makoto Fujimura; The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, by C. S. Lewis; The Image of God in an Image Driven Age, ed. by Beth Felker Jones and Jeffrey W. Barbeau; Wearing God: Clothing, Laughter, Fire, and Other Overlooked Ways of Meeting God, by Lauren Winner.

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