“Church after the rain,” Frankfurt, Germany

My Thoughts on Gender

By | Blog Interviews With Writers, Gender & Faith, Justice, Women | No Comments

We Talk Different is a podcast on culture, race, ethnicity, gender, politics, and theology. Recently my friend Jurrita and I were featured on the podcast talking about gender and faith and race. You can get the scoop at iTunes.

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The “Chrisitanity and Gender” Edition – 3.14.17 – Part II The WTD team wraps up their conversation with Jur… 3/13/2017 Free View in iTunes
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The “Christianity and Gender” Edition – 3.7.16 – Part I This week the WTD Team brings in the real intelle… 3/6/2017 Free View in iTunes
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Vindicating the Vixens

By | Gender & Faith, Women, Writing | No Comments

On March 23 at DTS, I moderated a panel discussion with Dr. Glenn Kreider, Sarah Bowler, Sharifa Stevens, Dr. Timothy Ralston, and Karla Zazueta about women in the Bible whom we have either vilified or marginalized. Vindicating the Vixens (Kregel Academic, forthcoming) is the result of a diverse team of 16 male and female theologians who’ve partnered to take a second look at vilified and marginalized women in the Bible, and we got some of the contributors in Dallas together to talk about our findings. The church has often viewed women’s stories through sexist eyes, resulting in a range of distortions. In this panel discussion, three of us DTS profs and three graduates talk about the women we explored.

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Protestants at 500 Years: The Best-Known Female Reformer

By | Marriage, Women | No Comments

In this year, which marks the five-hundredth anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation, many are focusing on the male reformers. But Germany is also focused on some of the females.  Though quite influential, they are often forgotten. And we can learn much from their lives. I’m thinking of one in particular.

Come back in time with me to about 1499 in what we know today as eastern Germany—then called Saxony. And picture a girl born to a noble family. When she turns five, her mother dies and her father sends her to a cloister.  There she receives a nun’s education.

When she is about 24, she and some of her friends—aware of the reform movement and dissatisfied with their lives in the monastery—seek to flee. Like so many others, they haven’t  taken vows of celibacy due to calling, but due to a parent’s decision (sometimes for reasons of …

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Last Week

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My vote for the best-kept secret of Reformation sites: Torgau.

 

Brass doors with 95 theses on them now stand where a wooden door in Wittenberg once served as the local posting-place where profs left announcements for students (pre-internet, pre-phone, pre-postal service).

 

It was a fab trip. But the guy next to me on the 10-hour flight was hacking, and I think he shared his germs. Ugh. More coming after I recover.…

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Eisenach and Erfurt plus Warburg Castle

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So far I’ve had a whirlwind trip in frigid temps. In seventeen-degree temps yesterday, we walked more than nine miles. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

I flew to Frankfurt and caught a train to Eisenach, where friends met me at the train station. On Epiphany, my friend Robin and I toured Eisenach, a picturesque town where Bach was born and baptized, and 200 years earlier Martin Luther sang in the same church as a choirboy. (Elizabeth of Hungary was also married here at age 14.) The Luther house and the Bach museum both had fantastic exhibits that we had pretty much all to ourselves.

In the afternoon, we toured Warburg Castle, where Luther hid out as Squire George and translated the entire New Testament in ten months. He had sparked quite a controversy with his writings.

In the evening, we took a train to Erfurt, where we’re staying in …

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Departing for Germany

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The past month has been a flurry of activity. I visited my mom and sister and her family in Oregon for our third annual Christmas Ships on the Columbia parade. I wrapped up the semester and graded about ten pounds worth of papers. And I hosted a bunch of family for Christmas, which included a day in Waco visiting Magnolia Markets and the Dr Pepper museum. The new year brought more family and packing…for Germany. I depart today on a nine-day press junket in Luther country as a guest of the German National Tourist office. (Please pray for me!) This year will mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, commencing on October 31, the day Martin Luther is said to have nailed his 95 theses to the door of the castle church in Wittenberg.

I’ll update you here as I’m able. Snow covers the ground where I’m going. I also …

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On the Nightstand/In My Kindle
Silence, by Shusaku Endo; Silence and Beauty, by Makoto Fujimura; The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, by C. S. Lewis; The Image of God in an Image Driven Age, ed. by Beth Felker Jones and Jeffrey W. Barbeau; Wearing God: Clothing, Laughter, Fire, and Other Overlooked Ways of Meeting God, by Lauren Winner.

I post on the Engage blog for women in leadership at Bible.org every other Tuesday.