“Church after the rain,” Frankfurt, Germany

Happy International Women’s Day!

By | Gender & Faith, Women | 2 Comments

Forty-three years ago, the United Nations (UN) named 1975 as the International Women’s Year. Two years later, the UN General Assembly invited member states to proclaim March 8 as the annual day for women’s rights and world peace. My friends in Belarus send me Women’s Day greetings annually, and when I visited Peru, I saw costumes, posters, and a parade to mark the event.

  • While some in the US observe International Women’s Day, it is much more popular in the southern and eastern hemispheres. In many places, men give their moms, wives, girlfriends, daughters, and female friends flowers and small gifts.
  • In about 30 countries, including China, Cuba, Russia, Vietnam, and Zambia, International Women’s Day is an official holiday.
  • In Bulgaria and Romania, it is observed as an equivalent of Mother’s Day; children honor their mothers and grandmothers with presents. In places such as Bosnia, Brazil, and Russia, women receive
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Abuse: Rise Up, Church!

By | Gender & Faith, Justice, Life In The Body, Women | No Comments

Today I have a guest writer whose story you need to hear: 

<<I’m not even sure if the Hebrew is correct.

But it doesn’t matter.

It means something to me.

This is where girls would have scars from cutting themselves in attempts to escape the pain of abuse. But by the grace of God, and by His grace alone, my wrist doesn’t have cuts. It says “Daughter of the King.”

There have been a few accounts and testimonies of abuse circling around social media lately, including the Larry Nassar case and sexual assault on campus in my hometown. And I want to help raise awareness for the sake of many victims and survivors of abuse who are being driven out of our churches.

My mom worked in the sex industry. I have seen, heard, and experienced just about every type of abuse. That kind of life was my norm. …

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Seminary Online: Isn’t That an Oxymoron?

By | Life In The Body, Writing | No Comments

I confess, I’m a slow convert to distance education. But I’m coming around.

My reservations have stemmed from my commitment to embodiment. Genesis starts with God’s dignifiying of physicality in the first chapter, and that theme runs clear through the Incarnation to the bodily resurrection. Isn’t our faith unique in its appreciation for physical presence?

And if that’s the case, how can any kind of decent education happen without embodiment? How can people possibly learn about our God without engaging five senses in the content? Doesn’t the Eucharist include taste, touch, smell, sight, and sound? As does baptism. How can somebody grow in Christ without the senses?

Yet, as I said, I’m coming around….

Of course, I still believe face-to-face is best. After all, the elder John wrote, “Having many things to write unto you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come unto you, …

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How the Tamar Narrative Functions in the Judah and Joseph Narratives

By | Blog Interviews With Writers, Books, Gender & Faith, Justice, Women | No Comments

I’m happy to have Carolyn Custis James as my guest today. In Vindicating the Vixens, she contributed the chapter on Tamar. In November she served on a panel of contributors who talked about narrative analysis at the national meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Here are some quotes from her remarks: 

[In the Genesis narrative] just as the Joseph story reaches a fever pitch and readers are on the edge of their seats, instead of following Joseph into Egypt, the narrator follows Judah away from his family into Canaanite territory and into a salacious R-rated story involving prostitution with his daughter-in-law Tamar. From a literary perspective, the narrator’s choice seems counterproductive. From a pastoral perspective, this sordid story is problematic, unsuitable for a G audience, and devoid of any spiritual value. Pastors often skip it….

Far from being a literary gaffe, the narrator’s decision to …

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Class in Multicultural Worship Arts

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DTS Offers a  New Winter Course on Ethnodoxology Jan 8–12

Check out this highly interactive and practical course, in which students will do the following:

  • develop a biblical and missiological framework for arts in cross-cultural ministry
  • gain practical tools for multicultural congregational contexts
  • learn songs and experiencing the arts of a variety of world worship traditions
  • integrate ethnodoxology principles into a community in which the student serves.

This one-week intensive course is offered in partnership with Dallas Theological Seminary and the Global Institute of Applied Linguistics’ (GIAL) Center for Excellence in World Arts on the GIAL campus Jan 8–12, with online work through the end of January. See these comments from past participants:

  • “I cannot imagine that any institution committed to evangelism and mission would not make an ethnodoxology emphasis an essential part of campus culture and academic life” (Dr. Mark Boughan, President, Emmanuel Bible College).
  • “This course is rich
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Lots of Updates and Links

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November was a bit of a whirlwind. I signed a contract with AMG for another book in the Coffee Cup Bible study series—Earl Grey with Ephesians. I taped an episode on the Empathy for the Devil podcast comparing the queens Jezebel and Bathsheba and the sexualization of powerful women. Check it out.

The Kregel Academic Book for which I served as general editor, Vindicating the Vixens: Revisiting Sexualized, Vilified, and Marginalized Women of the Bible, was finally released Yay! Took a long time to ship, but it has finally arrive in the hands of all those who preordered.

An interview with me about the book appeared on the Christian Authors Network blog; on the Beyond Ordinary Woman site; on the Seana Scott blog; and in Fathom Magazine, where you can also read an excerpt—Eva Bleeker’s chapter on Rahab. I spoke on …

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Fathom Magazine interview w/ me about Vixens

By | Arts, Blog Interviews With Writers, Books, Gender & Faith, Life In The Body, Women, Writing | No Comments

This interview with me ran in the latest issue of Fathom Magazine.  Today we’re happy to have as our guest Dr. Sandra Glahn. Sandi earned her ThM at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) and her PhD at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in Humanities–Aesthetic Studies. A professor in the Media Arts and Worship department at DTS, she teaches courses in writing, medieval art/spirituality, gender, and sexual ethics. She is the author of more than twenty books, including the Coffee Cup Bible Study series. But today we want to talk with her about her latest book Vindicating the Vixens: Revisiting the Sexualized, Vilified, Marginalized Women of the Bible (Kregel Academic), which just came out.

Tell us about Vindicating the Vixens.

Vindicating the Vixens has been on my heart and mind for more than a decade. As I studied history and cultural backgrounds at the doctoral level, I ended …

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Interview with a Charlotte Pastor/Author

By | Arts, Beauty, Justice, Life In The Body, Writing | No Comments

I’m happy to have as my guest today pastor/author Winn Collier, whose writing I love. His latest project is an epistolary novel—that is, a story told through the medium of letters written by one or more of the characters. It’s titled Love Big, Be Well: Letters to a Small-Town Church.

SG: Did you have in mind any specific congregations as you wrote?

Winn: I carried all the people and churches I’ve been part of my entire life. And of course, All Souls Charlottesville, the people I serve now, is so interwoven with my life that they are always with me.

SG: Charlottesville has been at the epicenter of America’s culture wars in recent months. How has your church continued to be a voice of hope in the midst of such toxic events?

Winn: The Klan rally in July, then the Alt-right rally in August, were horrific. I’ve never …

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Buy a Shirt/Help a Family Adopt

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If you know the Glahn family, you know our “son” Carlos and his wife Karla. They are in the process of adopting a little boy from China. And they are raising funds by selling adoption t-shirts. The styles include a long sleeved and a baseball raglan in addition to a typical t-shirt.

Our grandson-in-love is 9 months old, and they have named him Asher (Gen. 30:13). They expect to travel in five to six months, though Carlos is praying for a miracle of January travel.

Their adoption agency has asked them to get the remainder of their funds in order. Because or their friends’ generosity and spreading the word, they have sufficient funds to cover their final agency fees. But what they lack are  in-country adoption costs and travel expenses.

The agency has stated that a good estimate of in-country + travel costs is $15,500. (This estimate includes official …

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On the Nightstand/In My Kindle
Silence, by Shusaku Endo; Silence and Beauty, by Makoto Fujimura; The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, by C. S. Lewis; The Image of God in an Image Driven Age, ed. by Beth Felker Jones and Jeffrey W. Barbeau; Wearing God: Clothing, Laughter, Fire, and Other Overlooked Ways of Meeting God, by Lauren Winner.

I post on the Engage blog for women in leadership at Bible.org every other Tuesday.